mohrbr

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A lovely bit of cabin fever

HW 28 BIG STORY CHALLENGE PROJECT

140 (~ish)-words abbreviation:

Existentialism=attaching personal meaning & choosing how to live regardless if life has no meaning. Good life=finding a purposeful & personal way to spend time

3-7 words abbreviation:

Everything is nothing with out us

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HW 27 BIG STORY CHALLENGE PROJECT

Mentor:

There is no reason for us not to live passionately and authentically just because our surroundings are meaningless, boring, threatening, anxiety provoking, and overall unpleasant. Existentialism seems to be a philosophy of commitment and confronts us with the notion of freedom and the responsibility to it. I believe passion and desire move us to act. Motivation to act is a source of internal human energy that starts our creative engines. Motivation is connected to mood, as these two aspects of human experience affect our ability to act and function. One needs to be in a mood to be motivated to do anything. Mood, or disposition to act, is closely related to emotional state which we experience as internal and uniquely individual. Some people believed that mood is a link between life and thought. We all have a freedom of choice to a certain degree. What does one do with choses that can lead to feelings of guilt?

You mentioned “Matrix”, and it reminded me of another movie with Keanu Reeves, “Devil’s Advocate” where his character becomes the Devil’s lawyer, and uses his free will to escape the devil’s clutches by choosing death and taking his own life at the end. Freewill was a pass out of this impasse because it allowed Keanu to be the master of his own destiny albeit nihilistic. This story is connected to an idea by a well-known psychoanalyst who once said that “it is better to be a sinner in a world ruled by God, than to live in a world ruled by Devil”. Is this an also an example of existentialism?

Protege:

you said that each person has to create there own meaning to life, do you think that this ability to create our own meaning is hindered or benefit by our interactions with other people?

REVISED WORK

What is the primary big story in which I play the role of my life?

Throughout my brief and continues existence I have noticed that I have been following a particular set of believes that apply specifically to me. These said believes all indicate that I constantly try to add my own personal meaning to the world around me, hence making it liable for me to say that the big story I interact with is existentialism. Existentialism, very briefly, means the world and life have no value, however it is up to each individual person to create their own meaning to their surrounding. An even more simplified and poetic explanation of existentialism is the poem, A Summer Day , by Mary Olive. The narrator of the poem challenges the reader to “Tell me [the narrator], what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” The reader is reminded to take into consideration that everything dies in the end.

Two of the most common misconception about existentialism is that existentialist are depressed people, who are strictly atheists and view the world as meaningless. While existentialists do think that there is no pre-determined meaning to life, such as an afterlife, they do believe that everyone has a right to choose their own meaning in ways that are relevant to them. Many existentialists chose to find meaning by joining a religion, not because they were told to but because they found a deep spiritual connection relating to that community.

How does that big story compare and contrast with other big stories?

Since existentialism is the concept of being able to attach a meaning to one’s life almost every big story is relatable to existentialism. One of the big stories presented to us in this unit was “service to others”. As an existentialist one can still find meaning in helping others if it is something that one values. One of the big stories that completely contradict existentialism is nihilism. While existentialism claims that life has no big meaningful picture yet it is still possible to create meaning and purpose, nihilism claims that in fact nothing we will ever do would be meaningful.

What led me to this role and this story?

For me there has never been a pivotal moment in my life that made me realize that I am a part the “existentialism big story”. My whole life I have questioned my surroundings, purpose, and its relevance toward my life. For instance, lately, I have been baffled by the SAT and its connection to the meaning of life. I know that the SAT allows students to get into college, which would than possibly allow them to have a stable job and earn money; this raises the question of is getting a stable job what people want from life? To me this seems a very shallow and unfulfilling purpose, which makes me not want to take the SAT so much more, however I do acknowledge that other people find meaning in this goal. This is just an example that illustrates how I constantly view my surroundings through an “existentialism lens”. Which ultimately proves that neither a person nor an event had led me to this big story, but rather this is how my mind interprets and navigates the world around me?

Part 2: Implementing my Big Story

According to the big story I’ve been enacting, how should I live?

Existentialism asks people to live their life with the idea that life has no value, but instead each person has to create their own meaning and chose how they want to live their life. However, many people sometime struggle with finding their own personal meaning which causes them to feel as if they are aimlessly moving thorough life.

My definition of a good life is having a purpose which will allow me to enjoy as many of my living days as possible. Since I view life as a clock ticking toward our inevitable termination, I believe that the best way to live is by enjoying those ticking moment. This is not to say that one should appreciate everything that surrounds him or her, but rather one should filter what he or she values out of the dunes that is one’s life. I also believe that as people we tend to enjoy creating scenarios in which we began by having an intension, pour as much of our efforts into getting that intension accomplished, and eventually finish accomplishing said intension. My next logical step was to combine these two beliefs into one idea, which also happens to be my definition of a good life. This corresponds to the basic ideas of existentialism, because in both cases people are encouraged to find meaning in their life regardless of what will happen when they die.

Special requirements

Existentialism asks people to reject any notion that life has a predetermined fate to be followed and fulfilled, while also accepting the fact that each individual person can create his or her own personal meaning to help them live their life in a way that is fulfilling to them. This comes with the benefit that it allows people to have the free will to choose how they want to live their life without being restricted by predetermined requirements. In addition existentialism allows people to add meaning to something that will cause them to feel content with their life. Since existentialism is the ability to add meaning to what one sees fit, one is able to have a meaningful set of believes that can lead to only feeling happiness. This theory can also be applied to other emotions and interest, such as excitement, guilt, philosophical stimulating etc. However, this freedom comes at a hefty price which could cost one’s mental happiness. Most people are used to viewing their life as if it is one consecutive story leading toward a definite ending. Many people feel as if everything they have known has been completely shattered when they realize that life is not a story but in fact just the passage of time. This realization makes it difficult to find the motive to accomplish anything, because they will never amount to anything. Many people are able to move on from that unstable point of internal voidness and find their own personal meaning to their surroundings. However, others end up stuck in a limbo of emptiness and lack of motivation. Having to accept the idea that in fact life has no meaning is the hefty cost of living a existential life because it can rattle people’s mental happiness. Another price people often pay when enacting existentialism is baring the burden of freedom of choice. Since existentialism asks people to choose their own meaning one often feels ostracized when his or her believes contradicts that of the people in his or her community. Having the freedom to choose one’s own meaning can cause a person to feel like an outlier, which can lead that person to feel lonely.

Part 3: Questioning my Big Story
What are some standard questions that people who don’t practice my big story ask to expose complexities, cartoonification, and contradiction?
What other aspects of my big story seem questionable (too simple, too complex, contradictory?)
Should I rethink my participation in this story?

Many people view existentialism in an over cartoonified light which just states that life is without any meaning. However, this is so much of simplification that it muddles the actual explanation of what is existentialism. Existentialism is the acceptance that life will have no meaning until someone creates one for them self.  However, this philosophy raises the paradoxical self-contradictory that since life amounts to nothing, people’s own personal meaning in fact have no value. Since there is no after life or a big conclusion to one’s, all the accomplishments and meaning one creates will mostly likely be completely and utterly forgotten. If everything that will ever be done will eventually be forgotten it is possible that in fact our own personal meaning holds no value. Since all of our personal meaning has no real value then life ultimately has no meaning regardless of what we do.

I follow existentialism for the precise reason that it’s slightly more comforting than just accepting that life has no meaning. As I stated in my previous paragraph, I don’t think life has any meaning to it. This raises the question of why do I chose to follow existentialism instead of just accepting that life has absolutely no meaning. To me it is impossible to our cornet society with the knowledge that my life has no meaning. I, much like Cypher from the Matrix, chose to live in a false reality because it is so much more comforting to think that I can add meaning to certain things, instead of thinking that there is nothing meaningful in this world. I accept that life has no value yet I acknowledge the fact that I can create some meaning to my surroundings which is encourages enough to continue living.

I personally think that I should not alter my big story. Existentialism encourages me to keep on finding meaning in life regardless of how much of an insignificant being I am. Existentialism allows me to choose what is that I personally value in life without feeling obliged to follow someone else’s instructions. I do not want to feel committed to one set of belief that was made toward a generalized group of people; I want to live a life where I can determine my values and believes so they apply to me personally. Existentialism, for me, is the perfect mind set which allows me to fulfill my own requirements for finding meaning and purpose.

expecting

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HW 26 BIG STORY CHALLENGE PROJECT PART 2

Part 1: Describing my Big Story

What is the primary big story in which I play the role of my life?

Throughout my brief and continues existence I have noticed that I have been following a particular set of believes that apply specifically to me. These said believes all indicate that I constantly try to add my own personal meaning to the world around me, hence making it liable for me to say that the big story I interact with is existentialism. Existentialism, very briefly, means the world and life have no value, however it is up to each individual person to create their own meaning to their surrounding. An even more simplified and poetic explanation of existentialism is the poem, A Summer Day , by Mary Olive. The narrator of the poem challenges the reader to “Tell me [the narrator], what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” The reader is reminded to take into consideration that everything dies in the end.

Two of the most common misconception about existentialism is that existentialist are depressed people, who are strictly atheists and view the world as meaningless. While existentialists do think that there is no pre-determined meaning to life, such as an afterlife, they do believe that everyone has a right to choose their own meaning in ways that are relevant to them. Many existentialists chose to find meaning by joining a religion, not because they were told to but because they found a deep spiritual connection relating to that community.

How does that big story compare and contrast with other big stories?

Since existentialism is the concept of being able to attach a meaning to one’s life almost every big story is relatable to existentialism. One of the big stories presented to us in this unit was “service to others”. As an existentialist one can still find meaning in helping others if it is something that one values. One of the big stories that completely contradict existentialism is nihilism. While existentialism claims that life has no big meaningful picture yet it is still possible to create meaning and purpose, nihilism claims that in fact nothing we will ever do would be meaningful.

What led me to this role and this story?

For me there has never been a pivotal moment in my life that made me realize that I am a part the “existentialism big story”. My whole life I have questioned my surroundings, purpose, and its relevance toward my life. For instance, lately, I have been baffled by the SAT and its connection to the meaning of life. I know that the SAT allows students to get into college, which would than possibly allow them to have a stable job and earn money; this raises the question of is getting a stable job what people want from life? To me this seems a very shallow and unfulfilling purpose, which makes me not want to take the SAT so much more, however I do acknowledge that other people find meaning in this goal. This is just an example that illustrates how I constantly view my surroundings through an “existentialism lens”. Which ultimately proves that neither a person nor an event had led me to this big story, but rather this is how my mind interprets and navigates the world around me?

Part 2: Implementing my Big Story

According to the big story I’ve been enacting, how should I live?

Existentialism asks people to live their life with the idea that life has no value, but instead each person has to create their own meaning and chose how they want to live their life. However, many people sometime struggle with finding their own personal meaning which causes them to feel as if they are aimlessly moving thorough life.

My definition of a good life is having a purpose which will allow me to enjoy as many of my living days as possible. Since I view life as a clock ticking toward our inevitable termination, I believe that the best way to live is by enjoying those ticking moment. This is not to say that one should appreciate everything that surrounds him or her, but rather one should filter what he or she values out of the dunes that is one’s life. I also believe that as people we tend to enjoy creating scenarios in which we began by having an intension, pour as much of our efforts into getting that intension accomplished, and eventually finish accomplishing said intension. My next logical step was to combine these two beliefs into one idea, which also happens to be my definition of a good life. This corresponds to the basic ideas of existentialism, because in both cases people are encouraged to find meaning in their life regardless of what will happen when they die.

Special requirements

Existentialism asks people to reject any notion that life has a predetermined fate to be followed and fulfilled, while also accepting the fact that each individual person can create his or her own personal meaning to help them live their life in a way that is fulfilling to them. This comes with the benefit that it allows people to have the free will to choose how they want to live their life without being restricted by predetermined requirements. However, this freedom comes at a hefty price which could cost one’s mental happiness. Most people are used to viewing their life as if it is one consecutive story leading toward a definite ending. Many people feel as if everything they have known has been completely shattered when they realize that life is not a story but in fact just the passage of time. This realization makes it difficult to find the motive to accomplish anything, because they will never amount to anything. Many people are able to move on from that unstable point of internal voidness and find their own personal meaning to their surroundings. However, others end up stuck in a limbo of emptiness and lack of motivation. Having to accept the idea that in fact life has no meaning is the hefty cost of living a existential life because it can rattle people’s mental happiness.

Part 3: Questioning my Big Story
What are some standard questions that people who don’t practice my big story ask to expose complexities, cartoonification, and contradiction?
What other aspects of my big story seem questionable (too simple, too complex, contradictory?)
Should I rethink my participation in this story?

Many people view existentialism in an over cartoonified light which just states that life is without any meaning. However, this is so much of simplification that it muddles the actual explanation of what is existentialism. Existentialism is the acceptance that life will have no meaning until someone creates one for them self.  However, this philosophy raises the paradoxical self-contradictory that since life amounts to nothing, people’s own personal meaning in fact have no value. Since there is no after life or a big conclusion to one’s, all the accomplishments and meaning one creates will mostly likely be completely and utterly forgotten. If everything that will ever be done will eventually be forgotten it is possible that in fact our own personal meaning holds no value. Since all of our personal meaning has no real value then life ultimately has no meaning regardless of what we do.

I follow existentialism for the precise reason that it’s slightly more comforting than just expecting that life has no meaning. As I stated in my previous paragraph, I don’t think life has any meaning to it. This raises the question of why do I chose to follow existentialism instead of just accepting that life has absolutely no meaning. To me it is impossible to our cornet society with the knowledge that my life has no meaning. I, much like Cypher from the Matrix, chose to live in a false reality because it is so much more comforting to think that I can add meaning to certain things, instead of thinking that there is nothing meaningful in this world. I accept that life has no value yet I acknowledge the fact that I can create some meaning to my surroundings which is encourages enough to continue living.

I personally think that I should not alter my big story. Existentialism encourages me to keep on finding meaning in life regardless of how much of an insignificant being I am. Existentialism allows me to choose what is that I personally value in life without feeling obliged to follow someone else’s instructions. I do not want to feel committed to one set of belief that was made toward a generalized group of people; I want to live a life where I can determine my values and believes so they apply to me personally. Existentialism, for me, is the perfect mind set which allows me to fulfill my own requirements for finding meaning and purpose.


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HW 26 BIG STORY CHALLENGE PROJECT PART 1

Comments on my blog from Simon 

SIMON: Hello there Mohr. Let me begin by congratulating you on having the guts to give meaning to nothingness. After all, is that not the incarnation of existentialism? Other than some minor grammatical errors, the piece flowed quite well and came off as quite eloquent.
My only concern arose from the lack of emphasis on the hedonistic nature of existentialism. Also the “questioning my big story” section seemed to imply that you were settling for existentialism.
Don’t you think you should follow the truth?
If life has no meaning, how can we make meaning, your statement on paradox seems only to contradict your belief system.
I’m not telling you to believe what I believe, or to change who you are, but I think if you dug a little deeper into your mind, you may come up with something that sounds less strained.

ME: Thank you for the comment. To respond to your two questions at the end I understand why it may seem paradoxal trying to adding meaning to a meaningless life, however I proably have not properly explained that I am not trying to give life meaning but rather add meaning to what’s around me. Also I don’t think I clarified properly that I find it hard to find motive to do anything with the knowledge that in the end everything I do adds up to nothing. Hence I chose to live in denial .

My,not so beneficial, comments on Simon’s blog 

ME: Hey sorry for not writing sooner.
I think your explanation of how you enact and connect to your philosophies would be stronger if you A) clarified a bit what is your philosophy is about and B) where do you stand in the retrospective of your philosophy (do you agree with it a 100% is there some aspects that don’t apply to you [something along those line]).

SIMON: This philosophy is my creation, it is the manifestation of my belief. Also, could you please further explain what you mean by “clarify what my philosophy is about”. Is there something in particular that you think I should add?

ME: You should probably explain what nihilism is, because as you pointed out not that many people know about it.

SIMON:also as to defining nihilism in my paper, that is paragraph 3 (“… nihilist believes that nothing you have ever done, are doing, or ever will do, has any meaning/purpose”) Sorry for posting this here, but it wouldn’t let me respond to your response on my “wall”

ME now that I re read it I did notice that you mentioned it, I hope you can exuse my sleep deprived brain.

 [we also had a brief exchange in school in which I told him that I was unable to find to many noticeable flaws and that I personally agreed with his belief hence I could not come up with challenging questions]
Simon’s and My collaborated response to Naomi’s post
ME:
Hey Naomi. Overall I thought the writing styles were very informal and some sentences could be taken out. While reading your blog I came across some issues such as:

-On the first paragraph third line what did you mean by “just showing up”

-You should distinguish between the things you want to the future and what/who you are now. Example: in the third paragraph you said “through my work (as a psychologist)”; also on the fourth paragraph you said I want to provide that for my children as well.”

-Try not to generalize service to others to much, you should elaborate more.

-In what ways is your story about being in the wilderness, in the fourth paragraph, relates to the rest of the paragraph and/or your big story?

-If you are living the American dream do you think what you really want is “to have enough money to provide for my family and myself, so that I can be assured there is always food and shelter for my family and myself”? Don’t you think that you many want more than just basic necessities

-I think that your assumption, on the first paragraph of part 2, that just because “you are a psychologist” you will have a close knitted family is naïve. You should probably consider that A) most psychologists do not have that much free time and B) how you being a psychologist can negatively affect your family.

-On the second to last paragraph of part 2 you said “ Just trying your hardest is enough for me which makes my big story achievable for me”, you should probably elaborate on what happens if you try really hard and fail.

Lastly this is a question your big story in general: you say having a family is a big part of your “big story” but why is that? Why do you want to dedicate your life to people that have yet to exist, whom you have yet to meet, and in probability will not like?

SIMON:

Hello there Naomi, while reading your essay, there were several points of interest which stood out to me. First, there seem to be some “gaps in perspective”, in order for me to comment on this post fairly I feel they need to be corrected. As Mohr commented it seems unlikely that you are currently a psychologist for the criminally insane. A little revision would go a long way. Try to clear up what is and what will be. Also a proofreading or two would serve to eliminate the few grammatical errors I noticed. Overall your essay isn’t bad, it just lacks a direction, try to tie all its pieces together with a common theme, fixate on that theme, then proof-read it once or twice. Once you have your ideas refined I’m sure your writing will reflect your effort.

Questions:

Do people really ask you why you should be kind to others? If so, they probably need to see a certified psychologist.
How does psychology tie into your big story?
What do you believe comes after death? How does that coincide with your big story?
As you yourself mentioned, how do you propose to excel in the field of psychology considering:
“…I ask myself is do I really want to go through that much school? It seems almost impossible for me to become a psychologist sometimes because I struggle with focus. I don’t know if I want to go through all the schooling you need to become a psychologist.”
If you don’t want to become a psychologist, than maybe you should look into that a little more. Psychology seems to be a big part of you big story, if you don’t believe in it that strongly, than maybe you should reconsider some of your other preconceptions?
Here is a practical (albeit humorous) video on the success of the clinical psychologist, it may help you (or hurt you) feel free to have a look (note: it focuses on attaining a doctorate in clinical psychology, even so, I feel it is still relevant):http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ZaLipDgFZQ.
You want to “spend my [your] life working to help the really crazy people try to overcome and understand their psychological issues”, but what is sanity, can you truly judge what is healthy or unhealthy mentally? Just because someone has a different perspective, that does not mean they are wrong or ill.
best of luck,

-Simon

ME: to build of Simon’s last comment; at one point in the paper you said that you are interested in people having different opinions yet you want to “spent my life working to help the really crazy people try to overcome and understand their psychological issues”, in other words you want to change how they think. I suggest that you stick to one opinion so you won’t contradict yourself

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HW 25 BIG STORY CHALLENGE PROJECT

Part 1: Describing my Big Story

What is the primary big story in which I play the role of my life?

Throughout my brief and continues existence I have noticed that I have been following a particular set of believes that apply specifically to me. These said believes all indicate that I add my own personal meaning to the world around me, hence making it liable for me to say that the big story I enact in is existentialism. Existentialism, in a very brief explanation, is that the world and life has no value, however it is up to each individual person to create their own meaning. An even more simplified, and poetic, explanation of existentialism is the poem A Summer Day, by Mary Olive. The narrator of the poem challenges the reader to “Tell me [the narrator], what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” while taking into consideration that everything dies in the end.

Two of the most common misconception about existentialism is that existentialist are depressed people who view the world as meaningless, and that existentialist are strictly atheists. While existentialists do think that there is no pre-determined meaning to life, such as an afterlife, they do believe that everyone has a right to choose their own meaning in ways that are relevant to them. Many existentialists chose to find meaning by joining a religion, not because they were told to but because they found a deep spiritual connection.

How does that big story compare and contrast with other big stories?

Since existentialism is being able to create a meaning to one’s life almost every big story is relatable to existentialism. One of the big story presented to us this unit was service to others. As an existentialist you can still find meaning in helping others if it is something they value. One of the big stories that completely contradict existentialism is nihilism. Nihilism claims that not only does life have no value but in fact nothing we will ever do will add any meaning to it.

What led me to this role and this story?

For me there has never been a pivotal moment in my life that made me realize that I am a part the “existentialism big story”. My whole life I had questioned my surrounding’s purpose and its relevance toward my life. For instance lately I have been baffled by the SAT and its purpose. I know that the SAT allows students to get into college, which would than possibly allow them to have a stable job and earn money; this raises the question of is getting a stable job what people want from life? To me this seems a very shallow and un-fulfilling purpose, which makes me not want to take the SAT so much more, however I do acknowledge that other people find meaning in this goal. This is just an example that illustrates how I constantly view my surroundings through “existentialism lenses”. Which ultimately proves neither that a person or an event had caused me to interact with this story, but rather this is how my mind interprets the world around me.

Part 2: Implementing my Big Story

According to the big story I’ve been enacting, how should I live?

Existentialism asks people to live their life with the idea that life has no value, but instead each person has to create their own meaning and chose how they want to live their life. However, many people sometime struggle with finding their own personal meaning which causes them to feel as if they are aimlessly moving thorough life.

My definition of a good life is having a purpose which will allow me to enjoy as many of my living days as possible. Since I view life as a clock ticking toward our inevitable termination, I believe that the best way to live is by enjoying those ticking moment. This is not to say that one should appreciate everything that surrounds him or her, but rather one should filter what he or she values out of the dunes that is one’s life. I also believe that as people we tend to enjoy creating scenarios in which we began by having an intension, pour as much of our efforts into getting that intension accomplished, and eventually finish accomplish said intension. My next logical step was to combine these two believes into one belief, which also happens to be my definition of a good life. This is corresponding to the basic ideas of existentialism, because in both cases people are encouraged to find meaning in their life regardless of what will happen when they die.

Special requirements

Existentialism asks people to reject any notion that life has a predetermined fate to be fallowed and fulfilled, while also accepting the fact that each individual person can create his or her own personal meaning to help them live their life in a way that is fulfilling. This comes with the benefit that it allows people to have the free will to choose how they want to live their life without being restricted by predetermined requirements that have to be fulfilled. However, this freedom comes at a hefty price which could cause one’s mental happiness. Most people are used to viewing their life as if it is one consecutive story leading toward a definite ending. Many people feel as if everything they have known has been completely shattered when they realize that life is not a story but in fact just the passage of time. This realization makes it difficult to find the motive to accomplish anything because that accomplishment doesn’t amount to anything. Many people are able to move on from that unstable point of internal voidness and find their own personal meaning. However, others end up stuck in a limbo of emptiness and lack of motivation. Having to accept the idea that in fact life has no meaning is the hefty cost of living a existential life because it shakes people’s mental happiness.

Part 3: Questioning my Big Story
What are some standard questions that people who don’t practice my big story ask to expose complexities, cartoonification, and contradiction?
What other aspects of my big story seem questionable (too simple, too complex, contradictory?)
Should I rethink my participation in this story?

Many people view existentialism in an over cartoonified light which just states that life is without any meaning. However, this is so much of simplification that it muddles the actual explanation of what is existentialism. Existentialism is the acceptance that life will have no meaning until someone creates one for them self.  However, this philosophy raises the paradoxical self-contradictory that since life amounts to nothing, people’s own personal meaning in fact have no value. Since there is no after life or a big conclusion, all the accomplishments and meaning one creates throughout his will mostly likely be completely and utterly forgotten. If everything that will ever do will eventually be forgotten it is possible that in fact our own personal meaning hold no value. Since all of our personal meaning have no real value then life ultimately has no meaning regardless of what we do.

The precise reasons as to why I fallow the big story of existentialism because it is the most comforting while still being the most realistically reasonable big story. The majority of people’s life is centered around the idea that we all have to on keep living for as long as possible. Many people motives for continuing to live is that in fact they are living out a personal story that they have to fulfill. To me this thought that every single person has an individual story is ludicrous, because we are just a small sample of the whole universe. However, to me it is impossible to live a life in our cornet society with the knowledge that my life has no meaning. Instead I choose to find the best suitable compromise for a reason as to why I should continue living. I accepted that life has no value yet I acknowledge the fact that I can create my own personal meaning allowing me to have a reason to keep staying alive.

I personally think that I should not alter my big story. Existentialism encourages me to keep on finding meaning in life regardless of how much of an insignificant being I am. I am also able to choose what is that I personally value in life without feeling obliged to follow someone else’s instructions. Personally I do not want to feel committed to one set of belief that was made toward a generalized group of people; I want to live a life where I can determine my values and believes so they apply to me personally. Existentialism, for me, is the perfect mind set which allows me to fulfill my requirement.


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HW 24 – THEORIES OF HAPPINESS – PART A

Exhilaration: When one feels an amalgam of both fear happiness and the sense of successfully avoiding physical harm. This sensation is ignited when one finishes a dangerous task fairly unscathed. This sensation intensifies when said task is finished either in the presence of other people or recorded to be posted on the internet. Activities such as Parkour or any other extreme sports are great stimulants of exhilaration

Bliss: A sense ones feel when introduced to something that is complete perfection and harmony; such as the first ten seconds after entering a warm bath or the first bite of a delicious food. Even though this sensation tends to were off fairly quickly, it is quite alright considering bliss can be achieved on numerous occasions throughout the day (simplest method is drinking an exuberant amount of water and then excusing oneself to go use the bathroom).

Comfort (physical, not to be confused with mental comfort) : Comfort is when one feels dispelled from his or her surrounding while said person’s body is positioned perfectly so no one spot is irritated. This feeling seems to be the result of a person unconsciously shifting into a suitable position while the mind is deeply focused on something else. Much like falling asleep no one can pinpoint the exact moment of sleeping into comfort, but once a person has been made aware of his surrounding he no longer feels comfortable. For those who try to achieve physical comfort try to only focus on your train of thoughts and you will discover you have shifted into a comfortable position.

As an additional note I would like to add that orgasmic sensations are also a noteworthy as stimulants of happiness. However, due to school policy’s I will not ablate on that subject

I think that what places all of these sensations under the so called umbrella of happiness is that they help us to monetarily forget about other more straining matters. Life is made up of many experiences, thoughts, and emotions. However, many of the previously mentioned components of life are not only depressing but sometimes even traumatizing. As people we are able to withstand the pressure of all the negatives emotions we are exposed to by using different stimulants to distract us. This claim is biased on my personal experience with dealing with depressing and traumatic experiences. However, I am not claiming that using emotions that stimulate happiness in order to create a distraction is the only correlation between said emotions and happiness. I believe that different people have different views on how sensations are connected to happiness, and possibly they have a more optimistic interpretation than me.

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